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  • When is it Time to Raise Your Rates/Prices?

    This is a heads up to all clients and potential clients, not-so-cleverly disguised as an informative blog post. I am raising my rates at the beginning of April by about 10%. This is both a cost-of-living raise and reflects my improving skill-set and specializations. If you are a current client – don’t fret, I’m not going to raise the price halfway through a project. Rates for future projects may be slightly higher, or not, depending on several factors.

    If you are a new potential client and would like to lock in a project at the current rates, then contact me now – I’ll be quoting based on current rates till the end of the month.

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  • Top 3 Reasons Why It’s Better to Freelance Your Skills

    Guest Post by Lamer Cook

    Working as a freelancer is a fantastic decision in our current era, and the value of freelance work seems to be on the rise. There’s a few clear reasons why freelancing skills can be better than many career options for millions of people, and many employers could even learn a thing or two from all this.

    Reason One: Build an Immaculate Portfolio or Start a Business

    Most employers these days are looking for individuals that already have experience. This creates a kind of “dead zone” for entry-level workers with marketable skills. They want to gain experience with the job, but they can’t get the job to gain experience. It’s an unfortunate catch-22, and contrary to popular belief, a college degree does not replace the desire for hands-on experience in the workplace. Businesses do not want to pay to train people any more than they have to, and this attitude is creating a shortage of trained individuals.

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  • 3 Questions to Ask Yourself When Creating Digital Training Products, But You Should Ask Them Silently Because Talking to Yourself Is Just Too Damn Weird

    This week I accompanied 26 other sassy ladies in a post on Karen May Dy’s blog called 27 Hot Tips for Getting Your Digital Program Started. My tip is about asking questions and listening to the questions being asked by your audience, but I reckon you should hop over and check out the whole article, because there’s a ton of good tips in there.

    Are you thinking of creating a digital training product like an ebook, ecourse, video, podcast or email course? That’s great! For many small businesses who operate on a blog-based website (like mine) these types of training programs can be a great way of creating royalty-based income alongside more. As a freelancer, you’re constantly trading hours worked for money earned, which means that you quickly reach an upper cap on the amount of money you’re able to make.

    Creating training products enables you to add an additional income stream that you can sell long after you’ve finished the initial creation stage. I already have two products on Grymm & Epic – the Grymm & Epic Guide to Blogging and the Small & Awesome Guide to Freelance Writing – and I will soon be launching another – the Grymm & Epic Freelance Writing Course for People who Don’t Write Good (name change likely). I also sell a wedding planning ebook through my other site that does quite well indeed :)

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  • The Epic Guide to Teaching: Earn More Money and Grow Your Creative Business by Becoming a Teaching Artist

    This is a guest post by Emily Helms, an incredibly talented, intelligent and compassionate writer, bookworm and creative copywriter (she’s humble too, but trust me, this girl has the “brain smarts”.)

    If you’re a creative biz owner who is just starting out, I’m willing to bet that the money isn’t rolling in the door yet. In that case, teaching may be a great way to earn some extra cash while honing your skills.

    I’ve taught for almost two years in three different settings: out of my home, out of a community arts school, and most recently, out of a teaching studio at my local music store.

    In this post, I’ll go over some advantages and disadvantages of teaching to help you decide whether it’d be a good addition to your artist’s bag of tools. I’ll also go over some of the things you’ll need to consider before taking on your first victim…er, student.

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  • Freelancers: Dealing with the Lumpy Income Blues

    I read a wicked article on Freelance Switch the other day by Martha Retallick called Proven Solutions to Freelance Income Fluctuation. In the article, Martha outlines some killer strategies for beating what she terms the “Lumpy Income Blues”, which is a term I am officially stealing and using in my everyday freelance vocabulary. Mostly, Martha […]

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  • How to score your dream jobs – the heavy metal way

    In this week’s Epic Interrogation with the stunning Vail Joy of graphic design studio FutureNoir, Vail talked about generating interest in your sites by sending emails directly to contacts about your new projects or services. Since this is a technique I use to spread the word about Steff Metal and generate new business, I thought I’d discuss it further.

    Do you have “dream clients?” Maybe you think it would be awesome to design a t-shirt for TUK, or you’d love to collaborate with a certain musician. If you’re a writer like me, creating website copy for sites like Clockwork Couture and Actual Pain would be awesome fun.

    Those jobs aren’t just dreams – they do exist, but right now, the companies and individuals are using someone else, or not doing the job because they can’t afford it or haven’t found the right person yet.

    The right person is you.

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  • Epic Interrogation with Vail Joy of FutureNoir – designer behind steffmetal.com and grymmandepic.com

    If you’ve admired the bad-ass graphics and design of any of my websites, you’re should direct your compliments to Vail Joy of FutureNoir.net. Vail is the epitome of a grymm & epic businesswomen, running her creative design studio out of Slovenia, where she can indulge her bird-watching obsession and attend as many metal festivals as she wants, the lucky wench.

    Over 18 months ago I was thinking about updating my Steff Metal site and sent out a message to all my readers asking if anyone knew of a good designer. Vail answered the call and I’ve been bugging her with projects ever since. She’s friendly, super easy to work with, has the BEST ideas (have you SEEN my Cthulhu-themed copywriting packages? That’s all Vail’s work), and I recommend her to everyone I know planning a website – especially if you’re even a little bit alternative.

    vail-joy-future-noir

    Vail’s come over to Grymm & Epic today to talk about being a creative freelancer, money managing tips, and how to find the time to get to all the best heavy metal concerts.

    Firstly, we just want to know who you are, and what you do. Can you share your journey from mini-Vail to FutureNoir?

    Well, I am a transient cat herder and long-time lover of music, but make a living as an independent writer and designer. FutureNoir is a niche design studio focused primarily on web solutions for the creative industry – music, authors and artists.

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  • The Creative’s Guide to Asking for More Money

    [dropcap]I[/dropcap]n this week’s epic interview, I talked to burlesque beauty Leda Petit about the dance business. Leda says one of the best business decisions she ever made was to ask for more money.

    Wow, now that’s a scary thought.

    As creatives, the thought of asking for more money can be terrifying. You’ve only just got your little business going, and now you want to turn away all your clients / customers by putting prices up? It seems ridiculous. Bear with me, and I’ll explain why asking for more money or raising your prices won’t drive your customers away, but may set you up for real success.

    Are you paying yourself a fair wage?

    You have as much right to earn a decent wage as anyone, and there is absolutely no point being in business if you’re going to run yourself ragged for pennies – you’d be better off working part time and doing you art for fun.

    It’s time you sat down and worked out exactly how much you’re earning per hour. If it takes you three hours to paint a picture, and you sell that picture for $100, and you minus off $10 for materials, you’re earning $30 an hour, which sounds pretty decent, actually … but is it?

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